Erkki Huhtamo - Lost (and Found) in the Third Dimension:Stereoscopy and the Artistic Imagination

Oct 31st, 2011

Stereoscopic 3D has been a constant presence in Western societies for more than 150 years, and many of its features were anticipated even earlier. Stereoscopy is often treated as a cult phenomenon, a gimmick that appears and disappears over and over again. But it is much more than that. Beside popular-cultural applications, it has played roles in science, medicine, warfare ? and art. There are numerous artists who have been drawn to it, often commenting on the past uses of stereoscopy by their works. By developing an archaeology of stereoscopic 3D, this lecture reveals some of its earlier (oftenforgotten) manifestations, and demonstrates how these have been applied and developed further by a wide range of artists.

Speaker Biography


Huhtamo is a media archaeologist, writer and exhibition curator. At
D|MA his area is media history and theory. Professor Huhtamo holds a
Ph. D. in Cultural History. He has written extensively on media archaeology
and the media arts. Media archaeology is an emerging critical approach
Professor Huhtamo has pioneered (together with a few other scholars)
since the early 1990's. It excavates forgotten, neglected and suppressed
media-cultural phenomena, helping us to penetrate beyond canonized accounts
about media culture. Huhtamo pays particular attention to the "life"
of topoi, or clich├ęd elements that emerge over and over again
in media history and provide "molds" for experiences. What
may seem new often proves to be just new packaging of ideas repeated
during hundreds and even thousands of years. In recent years, Professor
Huhtamo has applied this approach to phenomena like peep media, the
notion of the screen, games and mobile media. He has also written about
the ways in which media artists like Paul deMarinis, Rafael Lozano-Hemmer
and Bernie Lubell have integrated media-archaeological elements into
their work.



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Categories: theory

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